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Thursday, March 30, 2017 - 2:33 pm

1966 – Golden Jubilee

The Problems of the 20th Century

in 1966 - Golden Jubilee

  The Twentieth Century we may probably characterise as the most prodigal in the history of the World.  In every avenue and in every sphere, the earth's resources are being used up at a rate never before equalled.  Land is being artihcially fertilized and remade so as to provide adequate food supply for the world's increasing population.  Industries are using up resources so speedily that a natural change is brought about.   A new environment is naturally being created for us, an environment which though for the time is satisfying our demands; will in the future create hardships or will be helpful to our successors; will create habitable conditions or will prove deterrent. Human life is not a simple thing like stepping from one condition into another automatically.  Life, before becoming so complicated, had its origin in a simple and uncompllcated form in the single cell by a process of evolutionary changes into higher and higher forms.  Changes are still taking place as evident from one ice age to another. Since mankind has successfully planted his foot on the earth and has trodden its pathways, there has been remarkable changes brought because of necessity and demand on his part in satisfying his needs.  But at the same time there has been no significant change in the earth's 24,902 miles circumference, its 145 million square miles of ocean, its 58 million square miles of land surface.   If the 14,710 million acres of cultivable land and about 2 acres per person living today. It is obvious since we live within limited bounds, every change we make in our environment would have a significant effect on mankind.  We must realise that as we alter things we will have to adjust to existing conditions.  Darwin's theory of survival of the fittest does not mean survival of the best, but the survival of those that are best fitted to cope with existing circumstances.  Evolution not only propounds what we came from, but the hope of changing to the logical conclusion. {mospagebreak}To what extent then shall the change we bring about to our environment have and effect the change we will undergo? One existing and pressing problem to be faced is the world's increasing population. ...

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Inter School Sports

in 1966 - Golden Jubilee

  Despite excellent performances by most of its athletes Berbice High was outscored by Victoria High in the Inter-High School athletic meeting at the Mental Hospital grounds on November 18.  The final score of 230 for V.H.S. to 215 for B.H.S. exemplifies the close and exciting competition between the two rivals.  Berbice Educational Institute finished a distant third with 115 points.   The defeat was in large part due to the lack of second and third place points.  B.H.S. actually gained the most first places, 19 compared to 14 for V.H.S. and 12 for B.E.I.  Berbice High had most of the stars, winning five and tying for one of the eight individual age group chaxnpionships, but as the results show, this was not enough to win the team titles. Residents of New Amsterdam were out in force to watch the exciting races and jumps, and the athletes gave them plenty to cheer about.  Besides the close team battle between B.H.S. and V.H.S. the spectators saw some outstanding individual performances.  Many of the "star" athletes were Berbice High Students. Together with two other athletes A. Elgin tied for the girls under 13 athletic championship.  She won the high jump at 3 feet 8 inches and placed second in the 80 yard sprint.  In addition she ran on the 440 relay team which only narrowly lost to B.E.I. Swift R. Anderson was the champion athlete for boys under 13. His feats included victory in the 100 in the time of 12.7 and running the anchor leg on the 440 relay.  When Anderson received the baton he was even with the Victoria runner, but coming round the last turn the Berbice High speedster made the other runner look like he was standing still.  In the girls 13-15 group R. Sinclair remained unbeatable. She gained impressive wins in the 100 and 150 yard sprints, and helped the relay team to victory.  This easily earned her the athletic championship for her age group.  L. Beharry won that honour in the boys 13-15 group.  He broke the tape in the 100 and 220 yard sprints with times of 11.9 and 28.5, then came back to anchor the 440 relay team to sizable victory with a...

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Inter-Schools Christian Fellowship

in 1966 - Golden Jubilee

  The I.S.C.F group takes pride in giving this report of its progress during the last year.  The group was revived during the early part of 1965 with the visit of staff workers Messrs R. T. Bell and N. Cowan from Jamaica.  The committee, which has now been increased to sixteen, comprises Mr. H. C. Buchan, sponsor, and Messrs P. Blunt and M. Rambali.   Student leaders are Mas. R.Ramdeholl, president; Mas. A. Rambali, vice-president; Mrs. R. Sunthgoolam secretary; Miss B. Kendall, treasurer and Miss L. Glasgow, librarian.  Besides these there are other "livewires" such as, Miss G. Leach and L. Beharry (V A II), M. Joseph (V), Miss M. Sanford and M. Henry (V B II), A. Sanford (V) and J. Munroe (IV B). A typical programme of activities for each term consists of at least two addresses by Ministers of Religion, Bible study, discussions and debates, bible quiz, presentation of short papers and one sack-lunch on a mid-day.  Our society is also proud of having served as the focal point from which I.S.C.F. groups have been successfully launched at V.H.S. and B.E.I., the two other secondary schools in our community. So far our group had the privilege of being visited three times by Staff worker Mr. N. Cowan, now stationed in Trinidad.  Mr. Cowan who gave us much encouragement on his second visit, by the request of our sponsor Mr. H. Buchan and through the auspices of the Gideons, five hundred New Testaments were distributed to the students. Our library was started as a result of the donation of a number of books by Mr. Cowan and Mr. Buchanan, President of the Goorgetown Committee.   Mr. Cowan was treated to a social by the three groups of I.S.C.F'ers at a joint meeting held in the upper flat of the Science building.  The members of the Berbice Committee including Rev. Soloman, president, and Miss Benons, secretary, were also present. Our hope and prospects for further increase are great.  Our influence is steadily spreading and God has blessed us greatly.  We look to the future in confident anticipation of greater and higher achievements for our Lord. Ronaid...

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Congratulations

in 1966 - Golden Jubilee

Congratulations to the following:   Mr. S. S. Ramphal on his appointment as Minister of State and Attorny General of Guyana Mr. A. P. Alleyne, Speaker of the National Assembly. Mr. G. Kennard – General Manager of the Guyana Development Coporation Mr. W. Stuart-Young, President of the Berbice Chamber of Commerc. Mr. D. A. Dow on being honourod with the Member of the British Empire Mr. M. Poonai who has been elected a member of the National Assembly Mr. C. J. E. Fung-A-Fat, on his appointment as Acting Puisne Judge of the Supreme Court Mr. D. Jhappan on his appointment as a Judge of the Supreme Court of Guyana Mr. Winston Haynes on his appointment as an Accountant with the Guyana Electric Corporation Mr. Norman Semple on his appointment as Labour Officer Mr. Willet Floris on his appointment as District Commissioner (Actg.) Mr. Leslie Johnson, Administrative Assistant at the Financial Secretariat Mr. Haroon Samad on his appointment as Deputy-Principal, Corentyne High School Rev. Neville Lalljee being made a Canon of the Anglican Church in Guyana Mr. Neville Bissember on being made Minister of Information   Congratulations to the following who are engaged:   Greta Beharry to David Turley (V.S.O.) Chandrawattie Mangru to Cecil Kennard Joan Lachman to Cyril Dabydin Noreen Khan to Neil Dow Joan Jones to William Choo-son...

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Students’ Code

in 1966 - Golden Jubilee

A student shall come to school regularly and punctually, and shall not take French leave. A student shall honour, obey and respect his or her superiors in rank, and shall not be rude to them. A student shall not exhibit any form of dishonesty. A student shall not chew his or her cud in the formroom, nor otherwise devour anything there, nor litter the campus with refuse. A student shall not speak in the formroom, nor bray, nor scream, nor whistle at anyone, nor keep any sound unless it is required of him or her, when he or she shall speak in the language deemed appropriate. A student shall not injure his or her neighbour, nor utter anything defamatory or derogatory concerning his or her neighbour, nor instigate his or her neighbour to do the like, nor in any way exacerbate animosity. A student shall not steal anything from his or her neighbour; neither his or her hat, nor his or her books, nor his or her friends. A student shall not smoke, nor drink, nor use indecent language, nor in any other way act in a manner that will cause the school to be brought into disrepute, but shall try to enhance the reputation of the school by exemplary conduct. A student shall not write or carve his or her name, nor another, nor write anything on the furniture or buildings, nor in any other way deface them. A student shall try to do his or her best at all times in all fields of endeavour, and shall try to emulate and ameliorate on the examples of those who went before him or her.   Muneshwar...

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The Pleasures and Trials of a Schoolboy

in 1966 - Golden Jubilee

What days are more pleasurable than school days?  What phase of life more enjoyable?  What gift more precious is to us endowed than the pleasure of being a schoolboy?   To the old these words are golden, and there is reminiscence of the joys of an enraptured youth.  To the young, and those of tender years, they may sound false, and echo like empty saucepans rolling down the kitchen stairs.Some think there is little pleasure in school life, that there is no freedom, no liberty to do as one thinks best.  Yet in spite of these shortcomings, to me there are no days more pleasurahle than those spent as a schoolboy. To a schoolboy there is no limit to his adventurous mind, in the classroom or an the playing field.  I remember that as a younger schoolboy I was renowned for my audacity. There was a rectory adjoining our school.  On its grounds there were some sprouting jamoon trees, from whose bulbs hung the most purple and delicious of all fruits.  Now these grounds were out of bounds, and it was up to someone to make himself a name by stealing some of those prized fruits.  At that time I was no ringleader, but afaithful follower of a big bully, who was preparing to create a reputation against the other ringleaders.  But for the jamoon trees he lacked courage. One day when everyone was at recess, I jumped on the garden wall and called for their attention.  Then I proceeded to do my bid by vaulting over into the rectory grounds.  Getting up the tree was no hard task, for I was lithe and agile as a monkey.  I returned a few minutes later amidst the cheers of my schoolmates.  Soon afterwardsthere was a mass invasion of the trees, which resulted in the capture of quite a number of slow-moving unfortunates. In school there is also the pleasure of "gang-rivalry."  Each group of hoys used to try to out do the other, in school work, at play, and in the martial arts.  There was constant friction between and within various of the gangs, and many a time did I return home with a black eye and missing shirt buttons....

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